Google and Facebook are Tracking People Who Visit Porn Sites

Pomidor Quixote
Daily Stormer
July 18, 2019

Jews are not just producing pornography and poisoning the goyim with it; they’re also observing the goyim’s pornography-watching habits.

The New York Times:

Silicon Valley’s biggest companies are always watching you — even when you’re browsing pornography websites in incognito mode.

Trackers from tech companies like Google and Facebook are logging your most personal browsing details, according to a forthcoming New Media & Society paper, which scanned 22,484 pornography websites. Where that data ultimately goes is not always clear.

“These porn sites need to think more about the data that they hold and how it’s just as sensitive as something like health information,” said Elena Maris, a postdoctoral researcher at Microsoft and the study’s lead author. “Protecting this data is crucial to the safety of its visitors. And what we’ve seen suggests that these websites and platforms might not have thought all of this through like they should have.”

Chances are they did think all of this through and they came to the conclusion that knowing more about the goyim’s relationship with pornography has no downsides for them.

After all, what are the goyim going to do?

Stop watching pornography?

[Laughs in alleged Holohoax survivor]

The Jews have a history of being perfectly able to get away with everything they do, no matter how blatantly damaging and insulting it is.

The study’s other authors — Jennifer Henrichsen, doctoral candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, and Tim Libert, a Carnegie Mellon computer science instructor — found that 93 percent of the pornography websites they scanned sent data to an average of seven third-party domains. The authors used webXray, an open-source software tool, which detects and matches third-party data requests to scan sites. Most of that information (79 percent of websites that transmitted user data) was sent via tracking cookies from outside companies.
Web tracking varies around the web. Frequently users are tracked via cookies, which are bits of text downloaded by your web browser when you visit a site. Other times trackers come in the form of invisible embedded pixels on your screen. In most cases, these trackers help sites identify and classify repeat visitors. They can help you stay logged onto a site, record your preferences and help manage your advertising profiles.

The study found that Google (or one of its subsidiary companies like the advertising platform DoubleClick) had trackers on 74 percent of the pornography sites. Trackers from the software company Oracle showed up on 24 percent of sites, and Facebook, which does not permit pornographic content or nudity on any of its platforms, had trackers on 10 percent of the sex websites scanned by the study.

The fact that the mechanism for adult site tracking is so similar to, say, online retail should be a huge red flag,” Dr. Maris said. “This isn’t picking out a sweater and seeing it follow you across the web. This is so much more specific and deeply personal.”

Oh, but it is. Pornography is something people consume, and nowadays people have been turned into quasi-automatons that attempt to construct an identity through their consumer habits.

It’s not just that people consume pornography in the sense that they watch it, but many people also literally pay for it, effectively making it just another product and “experience.”

The study found that only 17 percent of the 22,484 sites scanned were encrypted, suggesting that troves of user data could be vulnerable to hacking or breaches.

What these companies might be doing with pornography-site browsing data is a mystery. Oracle, which owns a number of large data brokers and has been called a “privacy deathstar,” could, for example add data collected by trackers with its current profiles. In the cases of Google and Facebook, which refuse to host pornographic sexual content on a number of their platforms, it’s not always clear why they are collecting such sensitive information, even if unintentionally.

Facebook and Google denied that potential information collected by their trackers on pornography websites was used for creating marketing profiles intended to advertise to individuals.

But even if the data is technically anonymous and not used for targeted ads, some browsing information may still end up in the company logs. And when it comes to pornography websites, the most basic browsing data is intensely personal because it is revealing. As Dr. Libert and Dr. Maris note in the study, nearly 45 percent of pornography site URLs “expose or strongly suggest the site content” and in doing so might reveal a visitor’s sexual identity or orientation, or lead third parties to assume a visitor’s sexual interests. “It can be very sensitive,” Dr. Maris said, citing URLs for specific interests like bestiality, and teenage and incest content.

Oh, yes. I wonder what Jews, who are behind the porn industry, could be doing with information about people’s porn-watching habits.

Truly a mystery.

People shouldn’t watch porn because it is overall bad for you, but right now it’s not realistic to expect the population to just avoid all porn — especially considering it is increasingly being shoved down people’s throats in advertisements, movies, TV series and places where you least expect to find it, which makes people “curious” about it and prompts them to end up searching for some degenerate videos online.

Using Tor Browser would prevent this tracking from taking place.

In fact, you should use Tor Browser for everything you don’t want tied to your public person. Keep in mind that logging into personal accounts (such as Facebook) while using Tor would tie your browsing session to you, which would defeat the purpose of using a privacy-oriented browser.

So, you know, don’t let the Jews know what you’re up to even if you’re just browsing cooking recipes, as the Jew fears the oven no matter what it’s being used for.

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