Social Scientist: Multiculturalism and Social Cohesiveness are Mutually Exclusive

Steve Goode
White Genocide Project
November 22, 2013

Even if multiculturalism were desirable (no one has explained why it would be, beyond ethnic food choices), it is sociologically impossible.
Even if multiculturalism were desirable (no one has explained why it would be, beyond ethnic food choices), it is sociologically impossible.

A Michigan state university sociologist, Zachary Neal says that making people from different racial, social, economical, or religious backgrounds live and function in the same area might not be possible, evidenced by one of his studies.

In a statement Neal said “these findings show it may not be possible to simultaneously create communities that are both fully integrated and fully cohesive . . . when it comes to neighborhood desegregation and social cohesion, you can’t have your cake and eat it too.”

In essence, he is saying when two or more groups of people are forced to share a country, the country is fractured and disunited.

This is pretty darn obvious common sense. An example of this is in Britain, where Grey furred squirrels are native. Biologists introduced Red furred squirrels from America and the Red squirrels killed most of the Grey squirrels. Today, Grey squirrels are almost extinct. As human beings, we are just highly evolved animals, it means that we operate under the same laws animals do.

He went on to say that the majority of people want to date people who are similar to themselves; by race, religion, social class, or any other divisions of society.

Neal’s study was based on several computer models of fictional neighborhoods. The study found that when a neighborhood is more heterogeneous (different groups of people) it is less united, and vice versa, when a neighborhood is more homogenous (same group of people) it is more united.

With a whiff of defeat, Neal said “These trends are so strong, it’s unlikely policy can change it. It’s not that local leaders and policymakers aren’t trying hard enough, rather, we now think it’s because the goals of integration and cohesion are just not compatible with each other.”

Neal’s findings have been published in the American journal of community psychology.

Source.

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