Vaccines Can Cause Infertility

Christina England
Natural Blaze
July 20, 2013

mother-child-infertility

I have been investigating whether there is a proven link between vaccines and infertility. What I have uncovered will shock many readers because I have discovered that innocent women and girls in developing countries have been deliberately experimented on, with the use of infertility vaccines, for many years.

They are not the only victims. Recently several vaccines used worldwide have also been found to cause infertility, including the HPV vaccines and many of the swine flu vaccines.

My interest in the subject began after it was reported that the Japanese government had decided to withdraw its support for the HPV vaccine schedule. This decision came after the government received approximately 2000 reports from women and girls suffering adverse reactions, including long-term pain, numbness, paralysis and infertility. [1]

This does not mean that Japan has banned or suspended the program, as the vaccines will still be available to anyone wishing to receive them. However, the medical provider will automatically inform anyone wishing to receive the HPV vaccines Gardasil or Cervarix that the Japanese government no longer supports the HPV vaccine program.
This Shot Changed One Girl’s Life Forever

Over the years, a range of adverse reactions have been reported worldwide after the HPV vaccinations. However, the discovery that the HPV vaccine has been found to cause infertility in some women has only been publicized more recently.

In 2012, the British Medical Journal published a paper by Dr. Deidrie Little titled “Premature Ovarian Failure 3 Years After Menarche in a 16 Year-Old Girl Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination,” in which Dr. Little detailed the case of a sixteen year-old girl suffering from premature menopause after receiving the HPV vaccine Gardasil. The summary of the paper states:

Premature ovarian failure in a well adolescent is a rare event. Its occurrence raises important questions about causation, which may signal other systemic concerns. This patient presented with amenorrhoea after identifying a change from her regular cycle to irregular and scant periods following vaccinations against human papillomavirus. She declined the oral contraceptives initially prescribed for amenorrhoea. The diagnostic tasks were to determine the reason for her secondary amenorrhoea and then to investigate for possible causes of the premature ovarian failure identified.

Although the cause is unknown in 90% of cases, the remaining chief identifiable causes of this condition were excluded. Premature ovarian failure was then notified as a possible adverse event following this vaccination. The young woman was counselled regarding preservation of bone density, reproductive implications and relevant follow-up. This event could hold potential implications for population health and prompts further inquiry. [2]

As the BMJ charges a fee to read their articles, interested readers can find a report about the case on the Weekly Briefing of the Population Research Institute’s website. The report states that Dr. Little said that before the sixteen year-old received the vaccine Gardasil during the fall of 2008, her menstrual cycle was perfectly normal. However, by January 2009, her cycle had become irregular, and over the course of the next two years, her menses (bleeds) had become increasingly irregular. By 2011, she had ceased menstruating altogether.

The Weekly Briefing stated:

In the Australian case, after testing the levels of numerous hormones, and the function of various internal organs, the girl was diagnosed by Dr. Little as having “premature ovarian failure”, which is defined as “the presence of menopausal gonadotrophin levels in association with over 3 months of amenorrhoea or oligomenorrhoea before age 40 years.

Further testing confirmed that all of her eggs—every last one—were dead. She was and is totally and irrevocably infertile.

The Weekly Briefing article has since been removed, but a complete copy of the article can be found on several websites, including Population Research Institute. [3]

Thousands of Women Are Now Infertile Because of Vaccines

It is extremely unusual for a girl of this age to enter early menopause. So, we must ask ourselves, was it the vaccine that caused her symptoms or was it something else?

I decided to research if there were any other reports or papers on the subject of vaccination and infertility. I was horrified by what I discovered.

I found a total of 56 research papers listed on PubMed relating to contraceptive vaccines, dating as far back as 1977. No doubt a researcher entering a range of different search terms could come up with many more. [4]

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